Biodiversity Projects

A healthy environment underpins so much of what is special and unique in Southern Tasmania. Our environmental projects focus on the preservation and protection of the species and communities that characterise our beautiful region. We carry out this work in partnership with numerous community groups, agencies, organisations and industries, working to protect threatened species and protect the natural assets that we all enjoy.

Our Biodiversity Program is working to protect and enhance the plant and animal species and communities native to Tasmania’s southern region. With a focus on threatened species, threatened ecological communities and important biodiversity areas, we are working closely with partners on projects that will deliver broad benefits to our natural landscapes.


Building from previous work, our projects take advantage of new and innovative technologies to achieve positive outcomes. Our activities address key threatening processes to our environment, particularly those from climate change and biosecurity risks, while building resilience in our landscapes to reduce these impacts.

  • Cat Management Actions for Eastern Quoll on Bruny Island

    Feral cats have contributed to the extinction of at least 22 Australian mammal species since colonisation and are continuing to drive biodiversity declines across Australia. Removing cats on a landscape scale remains an ongoing challenge in Australian conservation. Islands such as Bruny Island can be valuable safe havens for biodiversity. Island-based cat management programs that work towards eradication can have lasting positive outcomes for wildlife in these landscapes.

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    Feral cat in cage trap
  • Protecting Tasmania’s Threatened Flora and Communities

    Tasmania is home to some of the oldest species of plants on Earth, and our geographical isolation means many of our plants are found nowhere else in the world. This group of sub-projects is addressing threats to a select number of our most at risk plants and plant communities, and includes efforts to boost seed reserves and improve genetic viability, replant and reconnect plant communities, and engage the broader community in conservation efforts.

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  • Protecting the Breeding Population of Swift Parrots

    The critically endangered Swift Parrot (Lathamus discolor) migrates annually from mainland Australia to breed in Tasmania. Arriving around springtime, they seek out our flowering blue and black gums, form mating pairs and spend their summer raising chicks. While they often reuse the same nesting sites, they don’t always turn up at the same site over successive years due to variability in flowering from year to year. This unpredictability can pose challenges when it comes to conservation efforts.

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  • Tasmanian Quoll Conservation Program

    The Tasmanian Quoll Conservation Program (TQCP) comprises an Australia-wide group of institutions that manage the breeding of Eastern and Spotted-tailed Quolls to directly support wild populations within Tasmania and provide support for endorsed Eastern Quoll conservation programs across Australia.

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  • Protecting the Forty-spotted Pardalote

    Endemic to eastern Tasmania, the endangered Forty-spotted Pardalote survives in small, isolated mainland populations in the south east, as well as on offshore islands including Flinders, Maria and Bruny. It is under threat from the loss of its habitat (principally white gum – a critical feeding resource), its small population size, and the death of nestlings due to the larvae of an endemic parasitic fly that can kill up to 81% of chicks in infested areas.

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  • Supporting Orange-bellied Parrot Recovery

    The critically endangered Orange-bellied Parrot is one of 20 priority bird species under the Australian Government’s Threatened Species Strategy. Wild populations have been reduced to a single population that only breeds in one site in southwest Tasmania, migrating annually along the Tasmanian west coast between Tasmanian and coastal Victoria and south-eastern South Australia.

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  • Wedge-tailed Eagle Research Fund

    There is a lot that is still not understood about Tasmania’s Wedge-tailed Eagles in Tasmania. NRM South is working to address some of these knowledge gaps through the Wedge-Tailed Eagle Offset Fund for Cattle Hill Wind Farm. This fund is supporting high quality ecological or other relevant scientific research on Tasmania’s Wedge-tailed Eagles, the results of which will assist with their management and protection.

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  • Recovery Actions for Swan Galaxias

    Swan galaxias are listed as endangered under the EPBC Act and the Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 and are one of the Australian Government’s priority species under its Threatened Species Strategy 2021-2031. Researchers have identified Swan Galaxias as one of Australia’s most threatened freshwater fish at imminent risk of extinction within the next 20 years.

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  • Restoring Habitat for Red Handfish

    Red handfish, which are only found at select sites in southeast Tasmania, are considered to be one of the most vulnerable marine fish species in the world. Relying on modified hand-shaped fins to move across the seabed, they are only able to move short distances and can only live in areas that meet very specific conditions – which makes them very vulnerable to extinction.

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