Environment, Featured, News, Resources

New landholder factsheet for a threatened vegetation community

Tasmanian forests and woodlands dominated by black gum or Brooker’s gum ((Eucalyptus ovata / E. brookeriana) is a threatened ecological community unique to Tasmania. Under threat from land clearing, invasive species, grazing pressure and poor land management practices, much of the landscape where this ecological community occurred has been cleared

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Environment, Featured, News

Hunting for rare heath in the far south

In early November, NRM South’s Maudie Brown teamed up with staff from DPIPWE, Tasmania’s Parks and Wildlife Service and volunteers from Threatened Plants Tasmania on a population survey expedition to Southport Bluff and Southport Island in Tasmania’s far south. The team were on the hunt for Southport Heath (Epacris stuartii),

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Environment, Featured, News

Flying wild – what do wedgies get up to in the wilderness?

Most of what we know about the habitat requirements for Tasmania’s Wedge-tailed Eagle comes from research done at nesting sites and in human-modified landscapes. However, the first research project approved under Round One of the Wedge-tailed Eagle Research Fund will be looking into the unknown; how adult Tasmanian Wedge-tailed Eagles

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Environment, Featured, News

Stage 2 Bruny Island cat control project underway

NRM South is pleased to announce that the second stage of the Bruny Island Cat Management Program is now underway. This project (funded through the Australian Government’s Environment Restoration Fund) is working to reduce the impacts of cats on the island’s population of eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus), a species that

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Environment

Restoration of forestry sites

Norske Skog Boyer and NRM South met on the 19 December 2018 to discuss how they can team up to support sustainable forestry practices in southern Tasmania. Norske Skog Boyer have a commitment to reducing environmental impacts through sustainable practices, including the restoration of old forestry sites. Norske Skog Boyer

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Environment

Help our local handfish

Handfish walk with their “hands” rather than swim. They belong to a group of coastal anglerfish with a narrow distribution in southeastern Australia. There are 14 species with seven endemic to Tasmania and Bass Strait. Handfishes don’t have a planktonic stage, they lay eggs, and have parental care of eggs.

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